Make your own free website on Tripod.com

Home page

Latest Newsletter

Bulletin Board

Calender

Checklist of NT Vascular Plants

Constitution

Committee meeting minutes

Glossary

Library

Links

Newsletter archive

Plant photos
a change of format

Submission and feedback


NT
Threatened
Species
Lists


 


Cordia subcordata(Lam.) 

Fam: BORAGINACEAE

Last updated 23 April 2006 
63s ecs at 56 k


Description
A small spreading tree 5-10 metres in height. 

Bark
slightly rough, cream to grey with longitudinal fissures.

Leaves
Alternate, smooth, broad, ovate, blade 8 to 20 cm x 5 to 15 cm, glossy green above, paler with tiny hairs near midrib, below, occasionally 2 lobes at base, stalk 3 to 5 cm long.

Flowers
Large, bright orange, trumpet shaped, 3.5 to 5 cm long, in groups of 6 to 20 in terminal or upper axillary inflorescence.

Fruit
Smooth, near globular, dry woody nuts, 2 to 3 cm x 1.5 to 2.5 cm, persistent calyx at tip, pendulous, grey brown when ripe, contains 1 to 2 seeds.

Flowering
February to May or June

Fruiting
March to May

Features
Large, heart shaped glossy leaves, clusters of bright-orange trumpet-shaped flowers, hard globular nuts

Habitat
Coastal regions, on foreshore and dunes, monsoon vine thickets on stabilised dunes or low cliffs, above the beach, or occasionally at rear fringe of mangroves, monsoon forests associated with lowland freshwater streams. 

Cultivation
From fresh seed, adapts to moist well drained soil. A colourful small screening tree, well suited to coastal rehabilitation

Aboriginal use
Seeds are edible, firewood

Distribution
Darwin, Arnhem land, Kimberley, north Queensland, PNG, pan tropical from SE Asia to Mozambique

Photo: Mark Raines Coburg Peninsula 2003

References

Brock J. Top End Native Plants 1988 John Brock. Darwin. p126


Other Cordia subcordata  information


Return to Home page